Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Marriott Regency Hotel Omaha and Things to Do—2019 AHS Region One Meeting


Fireworks in the Gardens
2019 AHS Region One Meeting • Omaha, Nebraska • July 5-7, 2019
Hosted by the Nebraska Daylily Society
Charles and Heidi Douglas of Browns Ferry Gardens, Guest Speakers

The Nebraska Daylily Society (NDS) invites you to join us on Friday, July 5 through Sunday, July 7, in Omaha, Nebraska, for the 2019 AHS Region One Meeting. Click HERE for the registration form with fillable fields—you can use your computer’s keyboard to type your information—no handwriting is necessary!

Your registration includes the bus tour and four meals: Friday banquet, Saturday breakfast, Saturday lunch at Keast Daylily Gardens, and Saturday banquet. Guest meals for Friday banquet and/or Saturday banquet and/or Saturday breakfast are also available.

About the Hotel

The host hotel is the Marriott Hotel, 10220 Regency Circle, Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3706, 402-399-9000. Mention “Nebraska Daylily Society” to get the reservation group rate of $106 per night. This hotel has been completely remodeled as of September 2018. Parking is free and easy in the large 600-space parking lot. Click HERE to see the hotel pictures and amenities.

The hotel is just across the street from Regency Court, where you will find Bonefish Grill, Fleming’s Steakhouse, Williams Sonoma, Pottery Barn, Borsheim’s (Berkshire Hathaway’s jewelry store), and the nearby Whole Foods. Westroads Mall is a few blocks away.

Area Attractions

Omaha is known for its high number of delightfully diverse restaurants per capita. But good eating is just the beginning. Did you know there is much to see and do while you’re in Omaha? Consider extending your visit to experience all that Omaha has to offer. Here are just a few of our area attractions:
  • Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium 3701 South 10th Street, Omaha, 12 miles southeast of the hotel—Featuring 160 acres of animals and plants, you can easily spend an entire day at the zoo and aquarium and not see everything—click HERE for more information.
  • Lauritzen Gardens Omaha Botanical Center and Marjorie K. Daugherty Conservatory 100 Bancroft Street, Omaha, 12 miles southeast of the hotel—Escape and relax in an urban oasis of tranquil beauty while you experience this 100-acre hidden gem in the heart of the city. This living plant museum with formal gardens and walking trails is located in the beautiful riverfront hills. Over 100 species of birds and 54 species of butterflies have been observed in the gardens. The Conservatory offers 17,500 square feet of living art in a gradual twenty-foot rise in elevation from the entry to the northern end, with focal points such as a ten-foot water wall and a large pool with Victoria water lilies—click HERE for more information.
  • Old Market South 10th Street & Jackson Street, Omaha, 8 miles east of the hotel—A vibrant and eclectic arts, entertainment, shopping, and dining district—click HERE for more information.
  • Durham Museum 801 South 10th Street—Located in Union Station, beautiful architecture meets memories of the past. The Durham Museum offers many different traveling exhibits covering a range of historic and cultural subjects—click HERE for more information.
  • Joslyn Art Museum 2200 Dodge Street, Omaha, 7 miles east from the hotel—Joslyn Art Museum collects, preserves, and interprets visual art works—click HERE for more information.
  • Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum 28210 West Park Highway, Ashland, 24 miles southwest of the hotel—Lots of military aircraft as well as spacecraft are on display—click HERE for more information.
  • Boys Town 13628 Flanagan Boulevard, Boys Town, 4 miles west of the hotel—Guided tours depart Monday-Friday from the Visitors Center at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. and on weekends at 1 p.m.—click HERE for more information.        

Questions? Contact our 2019 AHS Region One Meeting Chair, RP Val Hoefer (hoefrv@gmail.com) or Registrar Leslie Rule (Leslie1967.2003@gmail.com).

Celebrate daylilies with us in Omaha on July 5-7. Visit with friends and meet new ones while we enjoy beautiful daylily Fireworks in the Gardens—don’t let the only thing missing be you!

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Bryce Farnsworth's Legacy: North Dakota State University's AHS Daylily Display Gardens


Remembering Bryce Farnsworth

Bryce Farnsworth of Fargo, North Dakota passed away during the evening on Thursday, September 13, 2018 after a sudden and unexpected heart attack. 

My husband Rich and I attended Bryce’s funeral on September 20 in McHenry, North Dakota. We were joined by Karen Schock, past President and founder of the Central North Dakota Daylily Society; Susan Holland, AHS Region One Daylily Pioneer newsletter Editor; Joan Zettel, liaison for North Dakota State University’s historic and contemporary AHS Daylily Display Gardens in Fargo; Barbara Laschkewitsch, NDSU Plant Sciences Liaison; Dr. Chiwon W. Lee, Professor, NDSU Plant Sciences; and others from NDSU.

 Bryce Farnsworth--image courtesy of Debbie Monbeck

Bryce Farnsworth served Region One of the American Daylily Society in many capacities. He became AHS Region One Historian in 2002 and became an AHS Garden Judge in 2005 and continued in these positions until his death. He faithfully attended annual regional meetings until 2018, when hospitalization with pneumonia forced him to cancel. He donated many daylilies to several regional meeting auctions, regional Internet auctions, and regional mail auctions over the years. Bryce also donated daylilies to new daylily clubs within Region One to get them started, and he donated daylilies to several club bargain sale tables.

Bryce’s personal garden was an AHS Display Garden. Bryce hybridized daylilies. He was a mentor to newbies, and welcomed them to the daylily world

Most significantly, Bryce was a daylily advocate. He was passionate about North Dakota State University's historic daylily, iris, and other plant collections in Fargo. He contacted me to save NDSU’s historic and modern daylily collection, iris collection, AAS and other display gardens from demolition (the entire area was to become a parking lot for the new College of Business Administration building).

Bryce and I teamed up with NDSU's Barb Laschkewisch; Karen Schock; and the late Janice Dehod, President of the new Canadian Prairie Daylily Society in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. We all met in Fargo with NDSU President Dr. Joseph Chapman and Vice President and College of Agriculture Dean Pat Jensen to explain the value of the AHS Display Garden’s historical collection with its rare cultivars and attempt to save these collections and keep them accessible. Our efforts were successful. We made such a good impression that Dr. Chapman canceled the rest of his meetings for that day and led us on an impromptu campus tour. More meetings of a happier nature followed. Dr. Chapman created a brand-new alternate campus entrance with much larger space where all the gardens were relocated.

Karen Shock, Bryce Farnsworth, Dr. Joseph Chapman, Mary Baker, Pat Jensen, Janice Dehod, Barbara Laschkewitsch, and other NDSU officials (summer, 2002)

NDSU’s historic daylily collection became the very first public AHS Historic Daylily Display Garden. Bryce served as the liaison for NDSU's Historic Daylily Display Garden and modern Daylily Display Garden from 2004 until his death. Bryce loved to collect daylilies and donated many historic and modern daylilies to NDSU.
Bryce Farnsworth--image courtesy of Joan Zettel


The Display Gardens at NDSU

Rich and I visited NDSU’s public gardens on Friday morning, September 21, before we returned to Omaha. It felt like Bryce was there, walking the gardens with us. The first thing we saw was the NDSU Agricultural Experiment Station sign below. Beyond this sign are the All-America Selections Display Garden beds. The AAS Display Garden beds were full of ornamental annuals providing a a palette of lush, gorgeous flowers in a beautiful setting. 

NDSU's gardens are located at 1200 18th Street North in Fargo
  
Next we walked through a display area featuring a variety of hardy perennials. Many were in bloom, while others such as Baptisia displayed lovely foliage.

Beyond the perennials area is a large iris bed and then daylilies—lots and lots of daylilies. The daylily garden consists of two large areas—the AHS Daylily Display Garden containing modern daylily cultivars, and the AHS Historic Daylily Display Garden featuring historic daylily cultivars and daylily species. The entrance to the AHS Historic Daylily Garden is marked with the following sign.



Not a weed was to be seen anywhere. Our visit took place during very late bloom season. Only a couple of the species daylilies and almost none of the modern daylilies were in bloom. We were surprised to see several historic daylily cultivars in bloom. One cultivar caught our eyes from several beds away, a tall, well-branched cadmium yellow. We got a closer look and the cultivar was none other than Arlow Stout’s diploid AUTUMN KING (1950). Scapes are registered at 54 inches tall with 3 inch blooms. The large specimen clump is in an unprotected bed and scapes are quite erect (with no leaning). Scapes are well-branched with many nicely spaced buds.

  AUTUMN KING (Stout, 1950) blooming on September 21 at NDSU


 AUTUMN KING (Stout, 1950) blooming on September 21 at NDSU


 Closeup of AUTUMN KING (Stout, 1950) blooming on September 21 at NDSU

Bryce was proud of his Norwegian heritage, and one of his favorite historic diploid cultivars, NORWEGIAN LASS (David F. Hall, 1955) grows at NDSU. It was not in bloom at NDSU this late in the season. Bryce gave me NORWEGIAN LASS, and it will always have a place in my Omaha, Nebraska garden. 

NORWEGIAN LASS (Hall-D.F., 1955) blooming in Omaha 

 Clump of NORWEGIAN LASS (Hall-D.F., 1955) blooming in Omaha 


The Lenington All-American Award Winners Bed

NDSU applied for and received a grant from AHS to establish a Lenington All-American award winners bed. Bryce and I worked with Oliver Billingslea, AHS Region 14 Director and Chair of Special Projects. Oliver convinced AHS that North Dakota State University was a good place to establish this bed (NDSU had all but 17 of the award-winners). The AHS grant helped NDSU complete the Lenington All-American collection. AHS members from Region One as well as from other regions generously donated many of the missing cultivars. NDSU created a new bed in a prominent location to house all the award winners. Part of the grant paid for a bronze sign labeling the Lenington All-American Bed, which thanks AHS for funding the bed.

 Lenington All-American Award Winners Bed sign

During our visit, we saw that eight of the Lenington All-American award winners were lost over winter. AHS members from Region One and other regions, please consider donating these cultivars to NDSU next spring.

If you can contribute one or more of the following Lenington All-American award winners, please contact Joan Zettel, liaison for NDSU’s daylily display gardens. Joan’s email address is momzettel@hotmail.com. Here are the eight Lenington All-American award winning cultivars NDSU needs:
JASON SALTER (Salter-E.H., 1987)
KING KAHUNA (Crochet, 1994)
OLIVE BAILEY LANGDON (Munson-R.W., 1974)
RUSSIAN RHAPSODY (Munson-R.W., 1973)
YESTERDAY MEMORIES (Spalding-W., 1976)
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN (Morss, 2005)
MARGO REED INDEED (Murphy, J.P., 2004)


Bryce Farnsworth’s Legacy

Bryce Farnsworth’s work at NDSU was widely recognized. On Friday, October 24, 2003, Bryce received the prestigious Prairie Garden Award for Excellence for 2003. Presented by the Prairie Garden Committee, this award is for excellence in horticulture. Bryce was the fourth person to receive the Prairie Garden Award for Excellence and he is the first non-Canadian award recipient. Bryce received this award during a ceremony at Assiniboine Park in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Bryce received the AHS Region One Service Award in 2009.

Bryce was a close friend, intelligent, with a heart of gold and a wonderful sense of humor. I was honored to name one of my best daylily registrations for Bryce in 2013. How I will miss him!

 BRYCE FARNSWORTH (Baker-M., 2013, tet)

I am happy that Bryce's legacy will live on in the daylily gardens he loved so much at North Dakota State University.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Attention, Region One Garden Judges


Don’t Forget to Vote Your Awards & Honors Ballot

2018 Awards & Honors Ballot Voting Deadline is September 1


2019 AHS Region One Meeting Includes Garden Judges Workshops 1 and 2

The Nebraska Daylily Society (NDS) invites daylily lovers from all regions to join us on Friday, July 5 through Sunday, July 7, in Omaha, Nebraska, for the 2019 AHS Region One Meeting featuring guest speakers Charles & Heidi Douglas of Browns Ferry Gardens.

If you are an AHS Garden Judge and need to renew, if you want to become a new AHS Garden Judge, or if you just want to learn more about evaluating daylilies in the garden, we offer Garden Judges Workshops 1 and 2 just for you!

Region One’s very own Nan Ripley of Walkabout Gardens in Nevada, Iowa will chair and instruct Garden Judges Workshop 1 on Friday, July 5 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the host hotel (hotel information follows). Nan Ripley will also chair and instruct Garden Judges Workshop 2 from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. on Sunday at McIntosh Daylily Place (outdoor restroom facilities will be available). Directions to McIntosh Daylily Place will be provided in your registration packet.

Click HERE for the registration form.

The host hotel is the Marriott Hotel, 10220 Regency Circle, Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3706, 402-399-9000. Mention “Nebraska Daylily Society” to get the reservation group rate of $106 per night.


About Garden Judging

Garden Judges evaluate daylilies as they naturally grow in the garden. Each pretty daylily bloom is more than just its face; that face is attached to the rest of the plant. Garden Judges look at the entire plant.

Garden Judges Workshops 1 and 2 instruction provides the knowledge and tools to consistently and impartially evaluate daylily performance in garden settings. Garden Judges annually vote the AHS Awards & Honors ballot. The Awards and Honors system relies heavily on Garden Judges, because Garden Judges select a majority of the AHS Cultivar Awards each year. Most awards are based on cultivars observed in the Garden Judge’s own region, so it is important to have Garden Judges in each region. Currently each region is allowed to have up to 20% of their membership as Garden Judges.

There is a $5 fee to take each workshop for credit, and a $3 fee to audit a workshop. Daylily lovers often audit workshops simply to learn more about their favorite flower as it grows in the garden.

The 2018 edition of Judging Daylilies in the Garden is informative and helpful, and is available for a free download to AHS members from the AHS Membership Portal Store. The handbook contains a comprehensive illustration of all the various parts of a daylily. My favorite section of this handbook is the informative Chapter 3: Characteristics of Daylilies, which I refer to often. Click HERE to order the free download version. You can also purchase a printed version of the handbook from Amazon.


Why and How to Become a Garden Judge

Consider becoming a Garden Judge if you love daylilies and want to learn more about them. Garden Judges learn to evaluate foliage, plant vigor, scape height, bud placement, overall beauty and distinction of the bloom and plant, resistance to disease, form, and bloom substance. Garden Judges grow all forms and types of daylilies and visit other daylily gardens in their region.

To begin training as a new Garden Judge, you must have been an AHS member for a minimum of 12 calendar months. When you finish taking Garden Judges Workshops 1 and 2 and are ready to submit your application to become a new Garden Judge, you must have been an AHS member for 24 consecutive months.

Before taking Garden Judges Workshops 1 and 2, you must read and review the 2018 edition of Judging Daylilies in the Garden.
           
You can take the Garden Judges Workshops in any order. Garden Judges Workshop 1 takes about two hours and is taught by a Garden Judge Instructor (or group of Garden Judge Instructors) in a classroom setting with a PowerPoint presentation. There is a brief (and easy) test at the end of the workshop with a 70% grade required to pass. Garden Judges Workshop 2 takes about two to three hours and is taught by a Garden Judge Instructor (or group of Garden Judge Instructors) in a daylily garden during bloom season. Hands-on instruction is provided so students learn to evaluate and point-score registered daylily cultivars and daylily seedlings.

When you finish both workshops, the next step is to fill out and submit an Application for Appointment as a Garden Judge form to your Region One President (RP) by the December 1 deadline. This application form is in your Garden Judges Workshop 1 and Garden Judges Workshop 2 packet. If you want to vote the current year’s Awards & Honors ballot, don’t wait until December 1—send the application form to your RP right away. In Region One, you would submit your application form to our RP Val Hoefer. Your RP will then approve and submit the form to AHS Garden Judges Records Chair Kris Henning, who will notify you of your appointment for a five-year term as a new Garden Judge.


Garden Judge Responsibilities

A Garden Judge's primary responsibility is to annually vote the Awards & Honors Ballot. The voting deadline is September 1. You can either vote online by September 1, or by paper ballot postmarked on or before September 1. Our current Awards and Honors Chair is Claude Carpenter.

During your five-year Garden Judge term, you must visit a minimum of 25 daylily gardens during bloom season, including at least 15 in your own region and at least ten different gardens. Garden Judges should visit as many daylily gardens as possible. Keep track of your daylily garden visits on the AHS Garden Judge’s Five-Year Visit Log form.

Garden Judges must take Garden Judges Workshop 2 once during years three through five of their Garden Judge term to renew for another five years as a Garden Judge.

During year five of their term, Garden Judges must fill out and send their Application for Reappointment as an AHS Garden Judge form along with their AHS Garden Judge’s Five-Year Visit Log form to AHS Garden Judges Records Chair Kris Henning by the December 1 deadline. Garden Judges will receive both of these forms in the mail from the AHS Garden Judges Records Chair early in year five of their five-year term. The forms are also available on the AHS Membership Portal on the Garden Judges Home page.

Garden Judges should grow a variety of daylilies of various forms and sizes to see examples of the complete garden plant and to familiarize themselves with all types of daylilies in their gardens. Garden Judges should especially focus on growing daylilies hybridized in their own region. Garden Judges should also attend regional meetings as well as AHS National Conventions, where they will see many daylily gardens.

Garden Judges must pay their AHS membership dues on time.

For more information, contact your region’s Garden Judges Liaison. In Region One, that’s Mary Baker (me). I’ve served as our region’s Garden Judges Liaison since 2011, and am happy to help you and answer all of your questions. You can also contact AHS Garden Judges Records Chair Kris Henning.


Why and How to Become a Garden Judge Instructor

Once you have been a Garden Judge for one full five-year term, you are eligible to apply to become a Garden Judge Instructor. Consider becoming a new Garden Judge Instructor if you are passionate about garden judging, and if you love to help others learn. Each region needs qualified, active Garden Judge Instructors.

To become a new Garden Judge Instructor, you must have served one full five-year term as a Garden Judge. You must also assist an accredited Garden Judge Instructor with instructing one Garden Judges Workshop 1 and one Garden Judges Workshop 2 (in any order). You must then fill out and submit an Application for Appointment AHS Garden Judge Workshop Instructor form and send it to your RP by December 1 during the year your qualifications are met. In Region One, you would submit your application form to our RP Val Hoefer. Your RP will then approve and submit the form to AHS Garden Judges Records Chair Kris Henning, who will notify you of your Garden Judge Instructor status.

Becoming a Garden Judge Instructor does not change the timeframe of your Garden Judge term. For example, if you are a Garden Judge in year two of your five-year term and become a new Garden Judge Instructor at that time, you are still in year two of your five-year term.

Once you are a Garden Judge Instructor, you must instruct Garden Judges Workshop 2 once during years three through five of your Garden Judge term to renew for another five years as a Garden Judge and Instructor. There is no fee for instructors to teach Garden Judges Workshops.


Garden Judging—A Privilege and a Responsibility

I am passionate about Garden Judging, and have been a Garden Judge since 2000 and a Garden Judge Instructor since 2004. As a hybridizer, the Garden Judge’s method of evaluating daylilies assists me with selecting seedlings for registration. I examine balance and proportion of scapes to foliage, branching and spacing of buds on branches, foliage, vigor, flower substance and sun resistance, color clarity, etc., and especially look for distinction. As a collector, I want to grow daylilies that make beautiful, healthy clumps and bloom over a long period of time. Garden Judge training provides the tool kit to analyze overall performance of my seedlings, registered cultivars, and the many beautiful daylilies from other hybridizers that dazzle in my garden.

It is an honor to represent my region as a Garden Judge. It is a great privilege and responsibility to vote the annual AHS Awards & Honors Ballot. It’s wonderful to see daylilies on the ballot growing in several gardens throughout my region, where I can evaluate their performance in locations other than my own garden.

Consider adding your voice—become a Garden Judge!

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

SAVE THE DATE--Fireworks in the Gardens on July 5-7, 2019


Fireworks in the Gardens
2019 AHS Region One Meeting • Omaha, Nebraska • July 5-7, 2019
Hosted by the Nebraska Daylily Society

Charles and Heidi Douglas of Browns Ferry Gardens, guest speakers

The Nebraska Daylily Society (NDS) invites you to join us Friday, July 5 through Sunday, July 7, in Omaha, Nebraska, for the 2019 AHS Region One Meeting. Guest speakers are hybridizers Charles and Heidi Douglas of Browns Ferry Gardens of Georgetown, South Carolina. Browns Ferry Gardens was a 2018 AHS National Convention tour garden. Charles and Heidi will present their programs on Saturday evening following the banquet.

The host hotel is the Marriott Hotel, 10220 Regency Circle, Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3706, 402-399-9000. Mention “Nebraska Daylily Society” to get the reservation group rate of $106 per night.

Your registration includes the bus tour and four meals: Friday banquet, Saturday breakfast, Saturday lunch at Keast Daylily Gardens, and Saturday banquet. Guest meals for Friday banquet and/or Saturday banquet and/or Saturday breakfast are also available. Please see the registration form for details and fees. For your convenience, the registration form has fillable fields, so you can use your computer keyboard to type your information—no handwriting is necessary! 

Click HERE to get the fillable 2019 AHS Region One Meeting form. 

Four large tour gardens and five lovely open gardens await you. Three tour gardens and all of the open gardens belong to hybridizers, so in addition to seeing the latest and greatest well-known daylilies, you will meet several “new to you” daylily introductions and seedlings from our very own metro-area hybridizers. To supplement all the beautiful daylilies in the four tour gardens, NDS gave each tour garden funds to purchase a collection of daylily club plants from the hybridizer of their choice (to be auctioned off during a future NDS meeting).

Gardens on Saturday's Bus Tour:
   Keast Daylily Gardens (Oakland, Iowa) Tom & Mary Keast—Jamie Gossard club plant collection
   McIntosh Daylily Place (Omaha) Phyllis McIntosh—Charles & Heidi Douglas club plant collection
   Daylilies on the Fritz (Cedar Creek, Nebraska) Lyle & Rita Kahnk—Paul Owen club plant collection
   Farmony Gardens (Omaha) Nancy Lee Anderson—Richard Norris club plant collection

Open Gardens on Friday and Sunday:
   Mary Baker’s Garden (Omaha) Mary & Rich Baker
   Hansen’s Daylily Haven (Papillion, Nebraska) Dave & Val Jean Hansen
   Ferguson Fantasy Flowers (Omaha) Scott & Linda Ferguson
   Doug Bremers’ Garden (Omaha) Doug Bremers
   Bob & Joanne Langabee’s Garden (Bellevue, Nebraska) Bob & Joanne Langabee

The Region One Daylily Auction begins on Friday evening at 7:00 p.m. and credit cards will be accepted. Shop our Bargain Table for outstanding daylily buys on Friday and Saturday (see the registration form for bargain table hours).

Region One garden owners, please donate daylilies for the auction and bargain table! Auction Plant Chair is Mark Langemeier and Bargain Table Chair is Susanne Milbourn (see the registration form for their contact information).

Nan Ripley will chair and instruct Garden Judges Workshop 1 on Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the hotel. Nan Ripley will also chair and instruct Garden Judges Workshop 2 from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. on Sunday at McIntosh Daylily Place (outdoor restroom facilities will be available).

But wait—there’s more! On Friday from 4:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m., Doug Bremers will host the Region One Hybridizers Slide Presentations. See the latest, greatest daylily creations from our very own hybridizers!

Celebrate daylilies with us in Omaha on July 5-7. Visit with friends and meet new ones while we all enjoy beautiful daylily Fireworks in the Gardens—don’t let the only thing missing be you!

Check back often for future blog posts about each tour garden, open garden, events, speakers, fun things to do while you're in Omaha, and more!